Tibetan Culture

The Sacredness of Nature in Tibetan Spiritual Traditions

The Sacredness of Nature in Tibetan Spiritual Traditions

In the high Himalayas the beauty and majesty of nature is a tangible presence, and a power to be reckoned with. Humans seem tiny amidst the towering mountains, expansive plateaus and vast sky. Storms can sweep over farms and destroy all the crops with huge hail in a matter of minutes. Snows can bury roads, houses and livestock. The rivers flowing from the snowmelt in summer are essential to survival in this high desert. As a result of the qualities of this unique, fragile, and beautiful landscape, Tibetans hold nature very sacred, and constantly work to bring balance between nature and human activities through their spiritual practices. In Tibetan monasteries each day begins with prayers offered with burning cedar to bring balance and harmony with the spiritual...

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Introduction to the Bön Tradition

This introduction, produced for guests of the Chamma Ling retreat center in Crestone, Colorado, gives a historical context for the Bön tradition, then proceeds to explain the distinctions of the four major forms of meditation in the tradition.

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Transforming Your Emotions Through the Six Lokas

Transforming Your Emotions Through the Six Lokas

January 16 – March 5, 2016 This online course reveals a very effective means of self discovery and transformation, based upon the ancient system of the Six Lokas, or realms of existence. On one level these realms of existence can be understood as realities separate from our own, and are traditionally described as the realms of the gods, demigods, humans, animals, hungry ghosts, and hell beings. In the mythology of these realms, each suffers from its own distinct malady, for example the gods are spiritually lazy for they live such a comfortable life, while the animals suffer from their ignorance since they do not have higher cognitive abilities. The mythology, stories and teachings around these realms are rich in their meaning and symbolism, and are easy to relate...

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Why Pilgrimage?

Why Pilgrimage?

A spiritual friend once remarked, “I don’t go on vacation. I travel on pilgrimage.” What might this mean? According on one dictionary, pilgrimage is: a journey to a place associated with someone or something well known or respected; life viewed as a journey. Pilgrimage as a sacred passage is practiced by most, if not all of the world’s spiritual traditions, with many beautiful variations and themes, and all seem to share a goal of self-transformation, discovery and renewal. From the Hajj to Mecca by Muslims, to the sacred journey to bathe in the Ganges by the Hindus, to the journey to the Holy Land by Christians, to the trip to the Wailing Wall by Jews, or the circumambulation of Mount Kailash by Buddhists, each tradition has its own stories, sacred sites, and...

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Lishu Institute Survey

Lishu Institute Survey

Lishu Institute is the fulfillment of Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche’s vision of providing a retreat center and study program for western students to do long-term, in-depth study and practice of the Bön teachings.  It took some time, effort and research for Rinpoche’s aspiration to manifest and in January 2009 Lishu Institute became the owner of land in Kotra Kalyanpur outside of Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.  This significant step was possible due to the devotion and involvement of Geshe Thupten G. Negi, a Tibetan-Indian and a Bön Geshe.  Because he is an Indian citizen he is entitled to purchase land in India and he did so on behalf of Lishu Institute. Since that time the first building on the Lishu campus has been completed and will provide classrooms and housing for...

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